Met Gala 2022: The Good, the Bad and the On Theme

This year’s Met Gala theme was ‘Gilded Glamour’, something which may not have been the best choice amidst inflation but was certainly an opportunity for opulent creativity.

But it seems that only a handful of the girls were not afraid to reference, or at least do it well. Here are our takes on the best and worst looks from the night.

Best

JAMIE MCCARTHYGETTY IMAGES

Lizzo and her flute in a regal Thom Browne look. She always genuinely looks like she’s having fun with fashion, something that’s so rare to see nowadays.

Maya

Rosalía, May 2022 (Theo Wargo/WireImage)

Rosalia heard the theme. She understood it. She embraced it. The halter neck detail tying to the sleeves and the beaded details were *chef’s kiss*.

Maya

Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Billie Eilish brought sustainability to the table in a custom ivory, completely upcycled Gucci gown.

Maya

Getty Images

The only Kardashian/Jenner who got it right in a Prada dress and hidden heels.

Maya

I have to concur that both Lizzo and Billie were on my best dressed at first sight too – the lace hand glove details from Billie and the stylish coat and hair from the flute Queen were understanding the part two theme for the Gala and the costume part of the whole thing; it is the Costume Institute after all. There’s just some additional notable highlights worth some nods from a mere observer.

Jill

Teyana Taylor was simply eye-catching in Iris Van Herpen. Every attention to detail.

Jill

@sza Instagram

Sza showed up and showed out again with the pushed up pleading for breath busts that corsets from the gilded era gave. The cylindrical hat and PU half sleeved gloves and thigh high shoes are adding to the subversion of the look.

Jill

Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Paying homage to the corruption during the gilded era, Quannah Chasinghorse wore a Native America-inspired look with baby blue shoes to match, just peeping out of the bottom of her iridescent dress. From the feathers in her hair to her distinctive face tattoos, the model is always making a symbolic gesture to her roots.

Jill

Rihanna’s statue was best dressed – there I said it. Rihanna was awarded a marble statue at the Met in her absence, because of course she was. The ethereal and natural image of a highly pregnant womxn, bare foot and poised was erected in the Metropolitan Museum in the image of Rihanna’s cover of Vogue magazine, Anna Wintour’s doing I’m sure. The remarkable work is a beautiful nod to the nature of life and a womxn’s shape at a time where Hollywood (more than ever) are using their bodies to contort themselves rather than their outfits, and openly admitting to bizarre and dangerous starvation regimes to fit into archived fits that should remain archived.

Jill

Worst

Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Why does everything Camila Cabello wear seem so ill fitted and cheap? We see where she’s going with this but the execution? Poor.

Maya

Photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Who? Who was it that allowed the likes of Kim Kardashian to wear a HISTORICAL ARTEFACT to a red carpet event? Tainting Marilyn Monroe’s name, she is sure to get makeup, sweat or even particles on the dress Marilyn war that sparked scandal when she sang Happy Birthday to John F Kennedy. At least one of the Kardashians, known for their exaggerated derrieres, should have opted for a playful spin on a bustle, which exaggerated the back of women’s dresses.

Maya

Kevin Mazur/MG22/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue

For Khloe and Kourtney’s first Met Gala, this was abysmal. Kourtney looks like she’s going to Whole Foods in that fit (sloppy) and Khloe’s fear of criticism made her play way too safe. As for Kylie, she looks uncomfortable and just isn’t pulling it off (white – get it? Because she wore Off White). But I’ll give kudos to her homage to Virgil Abloh, the mastermind behind the Milan-based brand.

Maya

Honorary Mentions: On theme

Photo by Kevin Mazur/MG22/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue

In a Burberry skirt and bouffant, Bad Bunny made his iconic met gala debut – with a twist on gendered clothing in the gilded age.

Maya

Getty Images

Parker worked with Christopher John Rogers to create this elaborate ensemble, paying homage to Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley, the first Black female fashion designer in the White House.

Maya

POP Sugar

Laura Harrier wore custom H&M and dazzled (on theme!) whilst doing so. From the chunky, layered pearl necklaces to the detailed, sparkling embroidery on the gown with a corset structure on top and a caged skirt on the bottom. The half sleeved gloves in none other than velour also adds to the opulence of the time, with slicked back hair and baby curls mirroring the trends of the era and the dark colours reflecting the mourning that came with it.

Jill

@enews Instagram

I can’t not include her when she continues to work fashionably to the level of Rihanna and Zendaya for the Met, matching her dress to the carpet year after year – and keeping it on theme. She gave us the carpet transition (her dress and gloves going from copper red to blue) each Gala deserves to see.

Jill

@enews Instagram

Blake Lively continued to deliver as she does best for the Met Gala after party.

Jill

Mike Coppola/Getty Images

I kept being drawn back to this look from Madeleine Petsch in Moschino. I knew I liked it but couldn’t put my finger on it being a best dressed number until I realised it kept catching my eye because it’s simply something I would 100% wear in real life. The emerald stone necklace, the Gemini birthstone nonetheless, and the bright yellow tones and shapes of the fit. It’s giving African wedding meets the gilded era with the addition of the enclosed long gloves that former First Ladies such as Jackie Kennedy would often be seen wearing.

Jill

Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Gemma Chan in Louis Vuitton deserves an honorary mention too, for all the right reasons.

Jill

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